Clinical Trial Demonstrates That EarlySense May Be An Effective Indicator for Respiratory Pattern Recognition

WALTHAM, MA – EarlySense announced the results of a small clinical trial conducted at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston that identifies complex respiratory patterns which were found to be correlated to patients' respiratory condition and have the potential to show when mechanical ventilation is no longer required.

"The study results show that unique, complex respiratory patterns have the potential to predict, on one hand, the patients' readiness to be separated from the ventilator, but, alternately, also the need for continued ventilatory support," said Dr. Gyorgy Frendl, MD, PhD, Director of Surgical Critical Care Research, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Assistant Professor of Anesthesia, Harvard Medical School, the Principal Investigator of the study. "For patients recently weaned from the ventilator, the appearance of these complex distress respiratory patterns indicated that they were likely to require further ventilator support:

Generalized disorganized respirations
Frequent [every 30-120 seconds] high amplitude gasping breaths
Periods of apnea >30 seconds
For ventilated patients, the above patterns indicated that the patient is not yet ready to be separated from the mechanical ventilator support.

"The ability to measure advanced respiratory patterns in a contact-free manner is a promising approach to improve care and keep patients safer," said Avner Halperin, CEO of EarlySense. We are honored that the EarlySense technology can determine respiratory patterns and provide clinicians with advanced tools to intervene effectively and, if required, early as evidenced in this study."

For more details, visit http://www.earlysense.com
 

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