Campaign Promotes Safe Li-Ion Battery Usage

The Power Tool Institute has launched a campaign it hopes will encourage consumers, contractors, and educators to “take charge of their battery” through extensive education that promotes the safe use of lithium-ion batteries in power tools. The campaign describes ways to reduce risks by choosing batteries from the original power tool manufacturer and avoid aftermarket or counterfeit batteries, which may not undergo the same safety testing. It also explains how to properly store and transport the batteries to limit risks, and how to recognize indicators that a battery is no longer operating properly and how to safely dispose of it. 

 

Takeaway Points

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  • Know that batteries are not interchangeable. Original-manufacturer batteries are specifically engineered and tested for use with the tools and chargers from the original manufacturer.
  • Aftermarket batteries may not be tested to the same standards as original manufacturer batteries and therefore may come with additional hazards that can result in fire, property damage, or personal injury.
  • Always transport and store lithium-ion batteries as instructed in the owner’s manual.
  • Avoid contact with metal objects, such as keys, coins, screws and nails, and liquids, which present safety hazards. Inspect batteries regularly for signs of damage, such as crushing, cuts, or punctures. Do not use a battery that has received a sharp blow, has been dropped, or is damaged.
  • Never modify, disassemble, or tamper with a battery. The performance of damaged or modified batteries can be unpredictable and dangerous.
  • When disposing of a lithium-ion battery, never throw it into the trash or a municipal recycling bin, as it can become a fire hazard. Instead, take it to a local recycling center or place it in a receptacle specifically designed for recycling batteries. If your lithium-ion battery is damaged, contact the manufacturer. 

For more information, visit the “Take Charge of Your Battery” page, visit the Power Tool Institute, call 216-241-7333,  and/or email [email protected]

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