IEEE Sensors Council - 2016 Call for Papers

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Networking & Communications

Utilizing Wireless Networking In Your Sensor Application

May 27, 2016 By: Cristin Dziekonski, CEL


Sensors Insights by Cristin Dziekonski

Wireless modules are now more reliable, power efficient, and more cost effective than ever, and require less development time to implement. Utilizing these solutions in sensor applications presents new opportunities for manufacturers.

Here are six key benefits of integrating wireless connectivity into your sensor application.

1. Increase installation flexibility: There are some places where it just isn't possible to run a wire, whether due to physical constraints, cost, etc. A wireless module, potentially also paired with a battery, can enable sensing in places where a wired installation is impractical.

2. Reduce installation costs: In both new installations and retrofits, the cost of installing wires to connect a network of sensors can equal or exceed the cost of the sensors themselves. A wireless network can enable sensors to be installed and commissioned in a quick, cost-effective manner.

3. Additional functionality: The addition of a low power wireless transceiver can facilitate new use cases for your sensor. Utilizing Bluetooth or Wi-Fi can enable direct connectivity to a smart phone or tablet, allowing the sensor manufacturer to utilize its user interface for configuration and reporting. Adding a wireless standard can also potentially increase reach across markets. For example, adding ZigBee or Z-Wave to the product can allow the sensor to be integrated into existing home and building automation networks as a standalone end device.

Figure 1

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About the Author: Cristin Dziekonski


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Cristin Dziekonski

CEL



Article
Utilizing Wireless Networking In Your Sensor Application   May 27, 2016
By: Cristin Dziekonski

Employing wireless solutions in sensor applications presents new opportunities for manufacturers.

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Seventh Sense Blog

LVIT Technology Offers More Flexibility for Less Money in Factory Automation Applications

May 26, 2016



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Internet of Things

Monetize the IoT Value of Your Sensors

May 27, 2016 By: Michael Slavik, Ph.D., InventureTrack Systems


Sensors Insights by Michael Slavik, Ph.D.

The Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data revolution is playing out today as more and more "dumb" devices are made "smart" by adding sensors and an Internet connection to sophisticated cloud-based database systems that generate analytics from this previously untapped data collection. Sensor design companies play a pivotal role in this process, providing devices that interface the physical world to this virtual universe, feeding it with data.

However, sensor companies face a challenge monetizing their contribution to this market. Teams creating data systems that collect, store and analyze IoT data sell high-margin software products that produce subscription annuities, providing profits and operational funding for the whole life of devices deployed in the world (Figure 1).

Fig. 1: Data systems collect, store, and analyze IoT data.
Fig. 1: Data systems collect, store, and analyze IoT data.

Likewise firms providing Internet connectivity build revenue streams by adding ubiquitous IoT devices to their subscription base. Companies engaged in designing and manufacturing sensors sell typically low-margin hardware devices that produce a one-time revenue for each device sold. The greatest part of the value of the IoT is the data and associated analytics, but sensor companies are not in a strong position to claim revenue from ongoing data collected by their devices.

Of course many sensors are used in final products or deployed by themselves with no IoT capability. Providing IoT capability may add utility for the end user but upgrading designs with internet connectivity and building or integrating with a cloud portal requires time and expense and may involve skills outside the core competencies of the existing engineering teams. In these cases a potential revenue stream is being left on the table, so naturally solutions are becoming available to recapture it.

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About the Author: Michael Slavik, Ph.D.


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Michael Slavik, Ph.D.

InventureTrack Systems



Article
Monetize the IoT Value of Your Sensors   May 27, 2016
By: Michael Slavik, Ph.D.

Sensor companies face a challenge monetizing their contribution to the IoT market.

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Sensors Expo

MEMORIAL DAY SPECIAL

May 26, 2016



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Tech & Product

MCUs And Development Boards Accelerate Embedded Design


MCUs And Development Boards Accelerate Embedded Design
STMicroelectronics
May 26, 2016

Now available are entry-level, mid-range, and high-end development boards for the latest members of the STM32F7 microcontroller (MCU) series. The MCUs enter volume production with up to 2 MB of on-chip Flash memory. Development tools include an STM32 Nucleo-144 board featuring the STM32F767 variant. Also available is a Discovery Kit supporting the STM32F769, which has TFT-LCD and MIPI®-DSI support. In addition, there are evaluation boards for the STM32F769 and the STM32F779, which has a cryptographic accelerator for security-conscious applications. The evaluation boards and Discovery Kit also come with a 4-inch QWVGA 800x400 MIPI-DSI display featuring a capacitive touchscreen. Price for the STM32F769I-EVAL or STM32F779I-EVAL evaluation boards is $360 The $79 Discovery Kit (STM32F769I-DISCO) and the $23 STM32 Nucleo-144 board (NUCLEO-F767ZI) are available immediately. For further information, visit http://www.st.com/stm32f7-nb  

STMicroelectronics
Burlington, MA
781-861-2650
http://www.st.com


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CompanySTMicroelectronics
CountrySwitzerland
URLhttp://www.st.com/
Tech & Product

OPO Offers Broadband Wavelength Tuneability


OPO Offers Broadband Wavelength Tuneability
Excelitas Technologies Corp.
May 26, 2016

The iFLEX-Agile high-power, continuous-wave (CW) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) employs optimized optics for fine-tuning of specific wavelengths from NIR to MIR. Controlled via USB, the component enables rapid and reproducible settings of any desired wavelength from 1.47 µm to 2 µm and 2.3 µm to 3.8 µm without the need to change optics or modules. Emission linewidths can vary from 500 GHz to below 1 MHz depending on the configuration and specific application. The iFLEX-Agile can also be customized upon request for extended wavelength range, narrow linewidth at 2,300 nm to 3,800 nm, higher power levels, higher wavelength tuning resolution, and mode-hop-free tuning over ranges greater than 10 GHz.

Qioptiq Ltd.
Denbighshire, UK
+44 1745 588000
http://www.qioptiq.com  

Excelitas Technologies Corp.
Waltham, MA
800-775-6786
855-382-2677
generalinquiries.na@excelitas.com
http://www.excelitas.com


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CompanyExcelitas Technologies Corp.
CountryUnited States (USA)
Embedded Systems

Floodgate Defender Emerges As the First Complete Low-cost Compact Industrial Firewall

May 26, 2016



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