Expedient Personal Emergency Radiation Detectors Free to First Responders

April 24, 2014

TUCSON, AZ -- As the Cold War rekindles, is offering free color-indicating expedient radiation detectors to all U.S. police and firefighters. This technology was created by the Department of Defense to aid first responders in response to 9/11. The radiation detectors look like dots and darken in dangerous radiation. They are peel and stick and can be attached to a drivers license or ID card.

The U.S. Department of Energy also created the homemakable Kearny Fallout Meter for use by the public. Free plans for the meter are available by searching "Kearny Fallout Meter" online.

B&A Products in Muldrow Oklahoma has a public special on the expedient radiation detectors. Buy one for $20.00 and get three free: In Salt Lake City, Utah, K-Talk Radio is offering the expedient detectors free to all residents until May 13th, but you have to go to the station to pick them up. The limit is four per person.

Users can test the expedient radiation detectors with a common smoke alarm. The sensor must be removed from the expedient detector and placed directly on the radioactive element in the smoke alarm. The sensor, which is white, will turn blue almost immediately and black overnight. The test ruins both the detector and the smoke alarm.

The expedient detectors are not meant to replace or substitute for proper radiation detectors. They are being issued now because if a nuclear bomb goes off in the current crisis there won't be enough proper radiation detectors available. The expedient detector is a stop-gap aid until proper detectors are available. More info on the detector can be found at

To get the free detectors, police and fire departments must send a letter of request with a SASE to:

Physicians for Civil Defense
601 N Tucson Blvd. Suite 9
Tucson AZ 85716.

For further details, contact Jane M. Orient, M.D., (520) 323-3110,

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